Caribbean History

Caribbean History Syllabus

Caribbean History Practice Questions

SECTION A

THEME 1: THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND THE EUROPEANS

THEME 2: CARRIBEAN ECONOMY AND SLAVERY

THEME 3: RESISTANCE AND REVOLT

  • Slave control: legal, economic, psychological, social, ideological, physical and cultural
  • Forms of resistance (male and female): insurrectionary and non-insurrectionary
  • Maroon societies:origins and development
  • The Haitian Revolution: causes and course
  • Consequences of the revolution for Haiti and the wider Caribbean: social, economical and political
  • Major Revolts (Berbice 1763; Barbados 1816; Demerara 1823; Jamaica, 1831)-causes, nature, consequences

 

SECTION B

THEME 4: METROPOLITAN MOVEMENTS TOWARDS EMANCIPATION

THEME 5: ADJUSTMENTS TO EMANCIPATION 1836-1876

  • Problems of sugar industry: labour, capital, technology, free trade.
  • Attitudes to labour: landowners, employers, free persons
  • Schemes of migration: European, African, Maderians, Indians, Chinese.
  • Economic effects of migration: supply, production, viability; Impact of labour supply on plantation, utilities, social services (schools).
  • Contribution of peasantry: social economic and political.
  • Crown Colony government: Old Representative Government, popular disaffection, changing Colonial office policy.

THEME 6: CARIBBEAN ECONOMY 1875-1985

  • Factors which caused decline
  • Measures to resolve crisis
  • Growth of Cuba’s sugar industry
  • Growth and survival of alternative agriculture
  • Industrial development factors
  • Effects of industrialisation

SECTION C

THEME 7: THE UNITED STATES IN THE CARIBBEAN 1776-1985

  • Reasons for United States’ interest in the Caribbean
  • Factors/conditions-imperialism, trade routes, national security; political instability, foreign interferences and ideological conflict as seen in: Cuba (1898), Puerto Rico (1898), Panama (1903), Haiti (1915), Dominican Republic (1916), Grenada (1983).
  • Economic, political and cultural consequences of United States’ involvement in territories listed above. Policies of Castro’s revolution.
  • United States’ response
  • Impact of Castro’s revolution
  • Impact of United States’ involvement in the English-speaking Caribbean

THEME 8: CARIBBEAN POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT UP TO 1985

  • Early attempts- Leeward Islands 1674, Leeward Islands 1871, Winward Islands 1874-1876. Economic, political and social reasons for failure.
  • Moyne Commission, outcomes of protest and riots, trade unions, political parties, adult suffrage and self-government
  • Movement to establish a federation: Reasons for unity-economic, social and political similarities. Role of the Colonial office.
  • Reasons for failure- economic, social and political factors.
  • Personalities involved in interrogation: early life, education, career, philosophy, and impact on movement.
  • Alternatives to independence

THEME 9: CARIBBEAN SOCIETY, 1900-1985

  • Social and economic conditions: housing, cost of living, working conditions, unemployment and health.
  • Organisations involved in improving living conditions: trade unions; governments (policies); women’s organisations; United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA)
  • Aspects of social life: ethnic/race relations, festivals and celebrations, recreation, transport and communication, art forms (architecture, visual and performing arts.
  • Religious groups: Christian churches-established and evangelical; Hindu; Muslim; African- Christian syncretic religions, for example Orisha, Shango; Kumina, Revivalism, Spiritual Baptists; indigenous religions, for example Rastafarianism.
  • Implications of membership: social, economical adn political.